C is for Commentary: Previews #289


Alabaster: Wolves

Alabaster: Wolves



Westfield’s Josh Crawley checks out things in the new Previews including Dark Horse’s Alabaster: Wolves HC, DC’s Wonder Woman #15, and Image’s Mara #1.

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Beauology 101: The Secret Identity Of Wonder Woman


Wonder Woman By Adam Hughes

Wonder Woman By Adam Hughes



Beau Smith loves the potential of Wonder Woman.

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C is for Commentary: Previews #281


Grendel Omnibus Volume 1

Grendel Omnibus Volume 1



Westfield’s Josh Crawley looks at some of the cool new stuff in Previews including Dark Horse’s Grendel Omnibus, DC’s Green Lantern: The Animated Series, and Marvel’s Avenger’s Academy.

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PHIL The Six Million Dollar Bionic Man HESTER East side SIGNING!


To celebrate the release of Dynamite Entertainment’s Bionic Man series (issues #1 and #2 are available now), Phil Hester (who is co-scripting the book with Kevin Smith) will be chatting with fans, sketching free head sketches, illustrating 11″ by 14″ black & white commissions ($80 each), and have original artwork available for sale at our […]

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10 THINGS ABOUT JUNE ’11 COMICS


Caniff

Caniff



KC Carlson looks at new comics coming in June.

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Beauology 101: I wouldn’t be caught dead wearing THAT!


Burt Ward as Robin

Burt Ward as Robin



Beau Smith takes a lighthearted look at superhero costumes.

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C is for Commentary: Previews #269


Witchfinder: Lost and Gone Forever

Witchfinder: Lost and Gone Forever



Westfield’s Josh Crawley takes a look at books available in Previews #296.

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Fifth Degree: This & That


Captain America/Thor

Captain America/Thor


Westfield’s Josh Crawley takes a look at comic happenings around the web.

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KC COLUMN: The Never-Ending Story, Part 4: 1986


Secret Wars

by KC Carlson

PREVIOUSLY ON NEVER-ENDING STORY: (Part 1) (Part 2) (Part 3)

The early 1980s were a tremendously exciting time for comic books, as comic creators were making bold new leaps in presenting their stories to an increasingly sophisticated audience. Superhero comics began to mature, introducing more and more elements of “realism” into the four-color pages. Long-dormant genres of comics — as well as brand new ones — appeared. Things were changing so rapidly that old publishers — pushed by their writers and artists — scrambled to invent new ways to present comic material, such as mini- and maxi-series and graphic novels. There was more emphasis on the self-contained story (with beginning, middle, and end), another mature industry development that the media and readers traditionally outside of superhero comic books began to embrace in a big way. And if the old-school publishers weren’t willing to try something new, there were dozens of young independent publishers anxious to experiment.

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Beauology 101: How I See ‘Em


Avengers #1
by Beau Smith

Let’s talk about Marvel and DC characters a little. Depending on your age and when you started reading comics, you no doubt have that time period wired into your brain and it makes a difference as to how you see the characters. Example: If you started reading Batman in the early 1960’s, then a part of you will always think of him with the Batcave, the giant penny, fighting bad guys like Gorilla Boss, and never having a story go more than one issue. A far cry from the Batman of the 1980’s when the “grim and gritty” trend began for him.

Neither is right or wrong, it’s just a matter of when you came to the party.

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