Markley’s Fevered Brain: Then and Now


Green Lantern: The Silver Age Vol. 1

Green Lantern: The Silver Age Vol. 1


What are your favorite comics? Who are you favorite characters? Wayne Markley shares thoughts on three of his favorites; Green Lantern, Flash, and Dial H for H.E.R.O.

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Markley’s Fevered Brain: Yea and Nay


Man-Eaters #1

Man-Eaters #1


There are lots of new comics that come out each week. Wayne Markley looks at some recent releases including The Green Lantern, Conan the Barbarian, and Man-Eaters and tells you whether he gives them a “yea” or “nay.”

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Markley’s Fevered Brain: I’m Crabby


The March of the Crabs Vol. 1

The March of the Crabs Vol. 1


The bizarre world of a species of crabs is examined in BOOM! Studios/Archaia’s The March of the Crabs. But Arthur De Pins’ trilogy is so much more than that as Wayne Markley explains as he examines this excellent series.

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IT’S LIKE EVERYTHING’S BRAND GNU!: COMICS FOR NOVEMBER


Green Lantern #1

Green Lantern #1


There are lots of new comics on the Westfield Web site. KC Carlson has some recommendations for you including Green Lantern #1, Marvel Knights 20th#1, Firefly #1, and James Warren: Empire of Monsters.

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Markley’s Fevered Brain: Grumpy Old Men


The Adventures Of Tintin: Prisoners Of The Sun

The Adventures Of Tintin: Prisoners Of The Sun


What do Tintin, Green Lantern, and The Defenders have in common? Wayne Markley looks back at some of the comics that shaped him as a fan and reader.

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Markley’s Fevered Brain: As I Was Saying…


Swamp Thing #24

Swamp Thing #24



Westfield’s Wayne Markley looks at DC’s Swamp Thing, Detective Comics, Green Lantern, Batgirl, and Nightwing.

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Markley’s Fevered Brain: I Do Not Hate Everything


Talon

Talon



Westfield’s Wayne Markley writes about some of DC’s New 52 titles that he enjoys.

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Fifth Degree: Random Link Blogging with Commentary


By Josh Crawley

While sometimes there are some noteworthy going-ons in the world of comics, there isn’t really all that much newsworthy. Combine that with my lack of anything else to ramble about this week and it looks like we’re going to be on an adventure of not-so-mythic proportions!

How it works: I’ll pretty much scan some comic book websites, sometimes click on links (and share them with you), and babble a bit about what I see and read!

Legion Annual #1 Interview

Legion Annual #1 Interview

But before I start (since it’s been lots of places before I got this idea), Scott Pilgrim’s six volumes have been printed in over one million copies total. That’s pretty awesome. Sidebar: I wonder how quick it would take digital sales to reach that number. Even more so, I wonder how it would look on a Kindle or a Nook.

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Fifth Degree: Previews 261 + Marvel Previews #82


Fear Agent #29

By Josh Crawley

As I write this, I’m listening to John Siuntris interview Kelly Sue DeConnick for his Word Balloon podcast. Maybe if you listen to it while reading this, you’ll understand me just a little bit better…

Probably not.

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KC Column: The Never-Ending Story Part 1


KC flanked by former Legionnaire artists, Cory Carani & Jeff Moy

by KC Carlson

Though we may be inundated by it in current superhero comic books, long-form serialized storytelling is nothing new.

The idea of telling a long-form storyline as a series of chapters originally dates back to somewhere between the mid-8th and the mid-13th century. The work in question? One Thousand and One Nights, more colloquially known in English as the Arabian Nights. They are actually a series of independent stories gathered together with a framing device, but as originally told, each story was shared over a period of nights, including some kind of “cliffhanger” ending, which would be resolved the following night. Some of the more famous of the stories include “Aladdin’s Wonderful Lamp”, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, and “The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor”, all of which are probably much better known to several generations of American children as the basis for three very memorable (and historically important) Popeye the Sailor cartoons.

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