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For Your Consideration: Marvel’s Captain America: Evolutions of a Living Legend

Robert Greenberger
Robert Greenberger


by Robert Greenberger

Captain America Comics #1
Captain America Comics #1


Steve Rogers wanted to fight to protect his country from fascism. Deemed unfit for combat, he was given a unique chance to make a difference. He agreed to become a human guinea pig, subjecting himself to the super-soldier serum and bathed in vita beams to be transformed into a physically perfect specimen. Blond-haired, blue-eyed, he was a far better example of Aryan supremacy than anything Adolf Hitler could offer up. Donning red, white, and blue chainmail, he championed justice in the United States and abroad as Captain America, sentinel of liberty.

That’s pretty much his story through the 1940s, and was even true after the Avengers found him encased in ice, resting in suspended animation. He returned to duty a man out of time, but remained every inch the perfect leader and symbol of freedom.

Captain America: Evolutions of a Living Legend
Captain America: Evolutions of a Living Legend


But Cap’s modern-day exploits weren’t as cut and dried as they were during comics’ Golden Age and more than once he questioned his place in the world, the validity of his mission, and role as a symbol. With those themes in mind, Marvel has assembled an interesting collection of stories in Captain America: Evolutions of a Living Legend. After pieces culled from Joe Simon and Jack Kirby’s Captain America Comics #1-2, the remainder of the book spans 1974 through today. All told, this is not just a fine sampler of Cap stories, but a chance to see some of comics’ greatest writers and artists show their take on the hero.

Captain America #180
Captain America #180


We pick up with Captain America #180 (December 1974) in the wake of the Hidden Empire storyline where he tracked corruption right to the Oval Office. The creative team of Steve Englehart, Sla Buscema, and Vince Colletta dealt with the man’s shaken ideals and his no longer feeling like symbolizing a country that has lost its way. Here, Cap remains committed to justice but will now operate as Nomad, a man without a country. No sooner does he don the costume, then he has to deal with Madame Hydra, who has reformed the Serpent Squad.

Captain America #337
Captain America #337


Marvel Executive Editor, continuity maven, and the much-missed Mark Gruenwald spent a decade with his favorite hero. During that run, he put Cap through his paces, including once more putting him in a different guise. When the Commission on Superhuman Activities tried to dictate terms, Steve Rogers returned the uniform and shield in issue #337 (January 1988). They anointed John Walker as the next Captain America, while Steve wore a black, white, and red outfit, began fighting as The Captain. With Tom Morgan and Dave Hunt, Gruenwald explored this turn of events as The Cap led a team of Nomad (Bucky Barnes), D-Man, and the Falcon. The Black Panther kindly provided him with a new vibranium shield for his cause.

Captain America #438
Captain America #438


Closing in on the end of his run, Gruenwald began the final arc with issue #438 (April 1995). First, he has to beat Flag-Smasher and Ultimatum, then finally gathers his closest friends and associates and tells them he is dying as his body is being rendered inert by the super-solider formula.

Captain America #451
Captain America #451


Don’t worry, he gets better. But eventually, he is challenged once more as seen in issue #451 (May 1996), with the new creative team of Mark Waid, Ron Garney, and Scott Koblish. As the solicitation copy read, “Exiled to foreign soil by the very country he is sworn to serve, Steve Rogers must don a new costume to clear his name and save the world yet again.” He uses the alias of Nathan Hale, a nice nod to the Revolutionary War. The issue also has a great splash that uses bits and pieces from Cap vs. Sub-Mariner from Avengers #4, Cap and Bucky vs. Hydra by Stan Lee and Jim Sternako from issue #113; Cap vs. Deathlok with art by Mike Zeck; Cap vs. a Baron von Strucker robot by John Byrne and Joe Rubinstein, and a shot of Cap and the flag by Frank Miller.

Captain America #3
Captain America #3


Cap was also reinvented by cosmic forces, including the time Marvel allowed Image creators to package his adventures as seen in Captain America #3 (January 1997) by co-writers Rob Liefeld and Jeph Loeb, drawn by Liefeld and inkers Jonathan Sibal and Lary Stucker. He’s stuck on a parallel world he’s only just coming to understand when that reality’s Red Skull attacks.

Secret Avengers #1
Secret Avengers #1


That proved a short-lived reality before he returned to the Marvel Universe proper. But it was a darker world, one that needed different methods to address the growing number of threats. One such variant was a covert ops team dubbed the Secret Avengers. In their first issue, we see Cap has recruited Valkyrie, Black Widow, Beast, Sharon Carter, Moon Knight, Ant-Man (Eric O’Grady, now Black Ant), War Machine, and Nova. This 2010 series was from Ed Brubaker and Mike Deodato, a precursor to the writer’s celebrated run on the star-spangled Avenger.

Captain America #1
Captain America #1


Speaking of which, that Captain America #1 (September 2011) is here with Brubaker and artists Steve McNiven and Mark Morales. We pick up with the death of Peggy Carter and you can see Brubaker sowing the seeds that will eventually sprout with the hero’s assassination in issue #25.

Captain America: Steve Rogers #1
Captain America: Steve Rogers #1


Don’t worry, he gets better. But he’s in for a wild ride. He spent a long period of time in Dimension Z, a result of Arnim Zola, where he aged and the serum began to break down. When he returned to his proper realm, he was now a fit 90-year old hero. Circumstances restored him to his proper vim and vigor although the government made Sam Wilson the new Captain America. As we pick up with Captain America: Steve Rogers #1, he’s back in uniform with a triangular shield and ready for action. But, in the hands of Nick Spencer and Jesús Saiz, we are treated to a funhouse version of Cap, whose reality had been altered by the Cosmic Cube. Now he was the deepest cover Hydra agent of all time, setting up a firestorm of mayhem in the comics and tons of mass media coverage.

Captain America #695
Captain America #695


Finally, when reality has been reordered and Cap has lived down his ruined reputation, Waid is back for his third tour of duty in the book’s final story, with art by Chris Samnee, from Captain America #695 (January 2018). Things more or less come full circle as Steve Rogers revisits the town he first toured after being resurrected from his ice block.

Cap has been through a lot and will continue to be tested but what this collection demonstrates is his resilience and belief in the ideals of America, never giving up on the country and protecting both it and the rest of the world from dangers in all shapes and sizes.

 

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For Your Consideration: Marvel’s Decades: Marvel in the ‘50s –Captain America Strikes!

Robert Greenberger
Robert Greenberger


by Robert Greenberger

In case you hadn’t noticed, Marvel’s 80th anniversary is rapidly approaching and they have come up with some clever ways to celebrate their past. Among these is there new line of collected editions under the Decades umbrella. Coming in January is Decades: Marvel in the ‘50s –Captain America Strikes!, a collection of stories that would have been a mere footnote had Steve Englehart not mined them for his brilliant Secret Empire serial.

Decades: Marvel in the ‘50s –Captain America Strikes!
Decades: Marvel in the ‘50s –Captain America Strikes!


In 1949, the superhero craze was pretty much over and while DC kept their Holy Trinity still in print, Timely publisher Martin Goodman cancelled his heroes to make room for new titles to latch on to the latest fads: crime and war. The Human Torch and Toro along with the Sub-Mariner had been cancelled while Bucky was shot, replaced by Golden Girl, and then Captain America stopped appearing in his own book which was renamed Captain America’s Weird Tales.

Young Men #24
Young Men #24


In 1953, Goodman watched his rival rake in the bucks with The Adventures of Superman on television and thought maybe he’d try his heroes once more. Timely had given way to Atlas as an imprint and the adventure stories found in Young Men were jettisoned in favor of his Big Three, starting with issue #24, cover-dated December 1953.

Writer credits for the era are virtually nonexistent so maybe it was Stan Lee behind the typewriter. However, what is known is that newcomer John Romita got a shot at heroic action by being assigned the Star-Spangled Avenger. In “Back from the Dead!” Cap and Bucky are resurrected, returning to the Army and now on the hunt for Commies.

Goodman must have liked the sales numbers because he cancelled the title, making room for Captain America, continuing its numbering with #76. Cover-dated May 1954, the bimonthly was joined with the heroes also appearing in that month’s Men’s Adventures #27. Romita drew just about every story with one seven-pager from Bill Benulis and Jack Abel and one from Golden Age veteran Mort Lawrence. Benulis was a short-timer in comics, lasting just a few years before giving up the freelance life to work for the Post Office.

Captain America #77
Captain America #77


The stories tended to be short, six and seven pages each, with zero attempts at continuity. Once Steve Rogers, retired from active service, learned his archenemy the Red Skull was once again active, he reported for duty. “Captain America…Commie Smasher!” was how he was billed during the early years of the Cold War so he was mostly dealing with gangs of spies. He spouted patriotic, jingoistic slogans while dealing out good old-fashioned American justice.

The pair of new super-villains he encountered was The Man with No Face and the Russian Electro (unrelated to the Spidey villain). Neither was much of a challenge.

Captain America #78
Captain America #78


The quest for freedom took the duo to New York to save the United Nations or track spies to Indochina and China. But, as these titles cranked out tonnage, the world was changing. Fear over the Communist threat waned as Senator Joe McCarthy was exposed as the redbaiting bully he always was. This was coupled with the Senate sub-committee investigating causes of juvenile delinquency: radio, movies, television, and comic books.

In just under a year, Cap and the Human Torch lost their new leases on life (Sub-Mariner lingered until a possible TV deal fizzled).

Lee ignored it all when he and Jack Kirby resurrected Cap in The Avengers #4 but Englehart was inspired by those stories. When he was writing the hero’s book in 1972, he struck on the idea that the 1950s Cap and Bucky were someone else, and were back. Renamed William Burnside and Jack Monroe, they had also been revived and were in search of the “real” America. With Sal Buscema, the storyline kept readers spellbound for a few years.

Captain America: Theater of War - America First!
Captain America: Theater of War – America First!


Rounding out the collection is a 2009 offering from Howard Chaykin. There were seven books called Captain America: Theater of War, one per decade of Caps stories career. In America First! Chaykin was freer to delve into the mindset of the Cold War, sending Cap behind the Iron Curtain with his World War II ally Nick Fury in search of spies, saboteurs, and fifth columnists. Chaykin acknowledges the continuity and this is the first meeting between Burnside and Fury, now a CIA agent.

The 1950s stories are curiosities and a snapshot of the times. You can see flashes of Romita’s signature style and it’s always a pleasure to watch Chaykin mine the past.

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2019 COMIC BOOK DEBUTS — MUCH MORE INTERESTING THAN 1920 COMIC BOOK DEBUTS

(WHY? BECAUSE THERE WEREN’T COMIC BOOKS BACK THEN!)

KC Carlson. Art by Keith Wilson
KC Carlson. Art by Keith Wilson


A KC COLUMN by KC Carlson

It’s true, there weren’t. Sure, there were comics strips, but it would be a little while before somebody decided to put together a collection of these sequential strips in a pamphlet-like format — and even later until folks got the idea to create new characters and series (like Superman in 1938). And just look what’s happened since then…

SPEAKING OF WHICH… DC COMICS DEBUTING IN JANUARY

Young Justice #1
Young Justice #1


One of the current Superman writers — Brian Michael Bendis — is debuting his own little corner of the DC Universe in January with the launch of a line of books under the name of Wonder Comics. (As in, makes you Wonder, don’t it?…) In an essay which opens the latest issue of DC Previews, Bendis outlines his plans for the new publishing group, which will launch in January 2019 with the revival of Young Justice and the debut of an all-new series called Naomi.

The original Young Justice comic book debuted in 1998 (20 years ago!) with the core team of Superboy, Robin, and Impulse, quickly adding Wonder Girl, a new version of Arrowette (the original not seen since the Silver Age of comics), and a new character, Secret. This original Young Justice series and team were created by writer Todd Dezago and artist Todd Nauck.

It caught on pretty quickly and eventually, pretty much every teenage character of that era of the DCU would stop by or guest star — including a kid version of Lobo called Li’l Lobo (until he renames himself Slobo). Also, the Justice League of the era assigned Red Tornado to “keep an eye on the kids”, and I bet you can guess how well that went over.

Young Justice was one of the better DC series of that era, balancing great action/adventure stories with off-the-wall humor and absurdity. It wrapped up around 2003 with the publication of Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day, which, as the title implies, has many of the characters growing up a bit and assigned to different super-teams. (It was also quite ambitious for its time, also (somewhat) tying into the Outsiders series of that era, Infinite Crisis, and (retroactively) the DC Special: The Return of Donna Troy.)

In the Bendis-written Wonder Comics version of Young Justice (illustrated by Patrick Gleason), he promises to “bring back your favorite characters from Young Justice past, and in great Young Justice tradition, we’re introducing you to brand-new voices and energies.” Superboy, Robin, and Impulse are quite prominent in the promotional material! Let’s hope we also see some of the girls.

Naomi #1
Naomi #1


Naomi, on the other hand, is an all-new character for the DCU. Again written by Bendis (with David Walker), art is by Jamal Campbell. Naomi is being promoted as having a very different and unique relationship to the DCU. The Young Justice (and maybe other) characters are shown with Naomi in the publicity art. Both titles will begin in January.

The Other History of the DC Universe #1
The Other History of the DC Universe #1


Moving beyond Bendis, I must say that The Other History of the DC Universe (written by Academy Award-winning screenwriter John Ridley with art by Alex Dos Diaz) is intriguing to me, since I’m such a sucker for “alternate histories” of the DCU (and their rich history in publishing them — as confusing as they are sometimes…) TOHotDCU (wow, that’s a funny abbreviation…) promises “to reframe iconic moments of DC history and chart a previously unexplored sociopolitical thread as seen through the prism of DC Super Heroes who come from traditionally disenfranchised groups.” So… probably NOT too much like Crisis on Infinite Earths, then… The focus in the first issue is on Jefferson Pierce (Black Lightning), and future issues will feature Karen (Bumblebee) and Mal (Pick-An-Identity) Duncan, Tatsu Yamashiro (Katana), and Renee Montoya (from the Bat-titles). The Other History of the DC Universe will be a five-issue miniseries of 64-page issues. It begins in late January.

Mysteries of Love in Space
Mysteries of Love in Space


Mysteries of Love in Space: Published just two weeks before Valentine’s Day, this 80-page one-shot will feature stories of love on other planets starring Superman, the New Gods, Green Lantern, Starro (!?!?!?), Hawkgirl, and even the Teen Titans’ new sensation, Crush! Eight romantic tales that will Fly You To The Moon!

MARVEL COMICS

Conan the Barbarian #1
Conan the Barbarian #1


Conan the Barbarian #1 & 2: That’s right! Marvel got the license back to publish the NEW adventures of Conan the Barbarian beginning in January by writer Jason Aaron, artist Muhmud Asrar, and covers by Esad Ribić. There are a million variant covers (give-or-take several hundred thousand…), and it looks like Conan’s been collecting a whole bunch of new hardware since the last time we’ve seen him. (How does that guy walk, anyway!?) Of course, I’ll want the Skottie Young variant and will never be able to find one! (sigh!) So, I’ll have to settle for the Blank variant and tell people it was actually the Magic Etch-a-Sketch variant and… Oops!

True Believers: What If Conan Walked the Earth Today?
True Believers: What If Conan Walked the Earth Today?


Also, the True Believers reprints this month are dedicated to classic Conan issues/covers! Only a buck apiece!

Guardians of the Galaxy #1 Wraparound cover
Guardians of the Galaxy #1 Wraparound cover


Guardians of the Galaxy #1: Being promoted with a #WhoAreTheGuardians hashtag, the wraparound variant cover shows a few dozen characters, so there seem to be more (much more) than the last time I read this series. It’s by the Thanos Wins creative team of Donny Cates and Geoff Shaw! Plus, Groot looks funny! (I’m a dead man, now!)

Captain Marvel #1
Captain Marvel #1


Captain Marvel #1: Yay! Captain Marvel is back in a regular ongoing series, just in time to tie into some movie or other… (Hey, Roger, what movie was that again!?) This series is by Kelly Thompson (writer) and Carmen Carnero (draw-er). There are also a few really pretty variant covers by Alex Ross, Adam Hughes, Joe Quesada, and more. The regular cover is by Amanda Connor and Paul Mounts and features several versions of the character! It’s also a return to Earth for Captain Marvel after a long time away. Hope she has a big DVR drive!

Black Widow #1
Black Widow #1


Black Widow #1: Somehow, she’s back from the dead. (Gotta love comics!) She keeps trying to be a hero, but she just keeps getting killed. I hope that doesn’t happen in this issue! It’s by writers Jen & Sylvia Soska with art by Flaviano and a cover by Clayton Crain set in Times Square on New Year’s Eve! (A new comic book cover trend?!?)

Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #1
Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #1


Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #1 & 2: Written by Tom Taylor (X-Men Red). Apparently it’s all about Spider-Man being a bad neighbor. Juann Cabal is the artist, and there are too many variant cover artists (including the ever-reliable TBA) to list here. Stupid Marvel.

Invaders #1
Invaders #1


Invaders #1: It’s a new version of the Invaders, now set in the present (instead of the WWII era), but this time it’s the Invaders vs. Namor! Question: Do these guys from WW II actually like the stupid body armor they are wearing on the cover of this issue? Written by Chip Zdarsky with art by Carlos Magno and Butch Guice. Variant covers alert.

Champions #1
Champions #1


Champions #1: The Champions have gone global! There are dozens of new members under Ms. Marvel’s leadership. So, of course, there’s some dark secret… (Spider-Man’s feet smell bad after crime-fighting?) By Jim Zub and Steven Cummings.

Fantastic Four #6
Fantastic Four #6


Fantastic Four #6: Surprise! Galactus has returned to devour the Earth… and only one man can save us: Doctor Doom! So where are the Fantastic Four? There’s even a nice Bill Sienkiewicz variant Ben Grimm cover — so where the heck is he? Sheesh!

Man Without Fear #1
Man Without Fear #1


Man Without Fear #1-5: Daredevil is apparently gone. So other people star in this miniseries including Foggy Nelson (#1), the Defenders (#2), the many loves of Matt Murdock (#3), the Kingpin (#4), and a mysterious Guardian Devil (#5). Are you ready for five new Daredevil ongoing spin-offs! (Kidding!…kidding!…)

Age of X-Man Alpha
Age of X-Man Alpha


And then there’s something called Age of X-Man Alpha #1 which has no useful plot information at all, so good luck trying to order that one with nothing to go on…

Marvel Comics Presents #1
Marvel Comics Presents #1


However, Marvel Comics Presents #1 is back for a new 40-page story about Wolverine in the 1940s! Plus WWII tales about Namor and Captain America.

War is Hell #1
War is Hell #1


In celebrating 80 Years of Marvel Comics, they are releasing several 32-page one-shots with different genres, starting this month with Crypt of Shadows #1 (horror stories), Journey Into Unknown Worlds #1 (odd sci-fi & terror!), and War Is Hell #1, including a new WWII story by Howard Chaykin and “War Glammer”, a tale set in modern Afghanistan.

Uncanny X-Men Annual #1
Uncanny X-Men Annual #1


Marvel’s being cagey with their info about Uncanny X-Men #8-10 and Annual #1, which makes me think that they are leading into yet another restart sometime soon. These mutant guys sure like their first issues, don’t they? Intriguingly, the cover of Uncanny X-Men Annual #1 features at least nine different versions of Cyclops!

Marvel Knights 20th #6
Marvel Knights 20th #6


The Marvel Knights 20th Anniversary miniseries comes to an end in January, and Marvel’s promising “a secret that may shatter the very foundation of the Marvel Universe!” Again? These comic book universes are never going to be old enough to drink!

Avengers #12
Avengers #12


Avengers #12 presents an all-new Secret Avengers team, based in Wakanda! Say howdy to Gorilla Man, Ka-Zar, and the other new Agents of Wakanda. Meanwhile, Avengers #13 introduces the Iron Fist of 1,000,000 B.C.! Why?…

Immortal Hulk #11
Immortal Hulk #11


He may be the Immortal Hulk, but he’s also in Hell! (and in good company!) in Immortal Hulk #11 & 12.

Tony Stark: Iron Man #8
Tony Stark: Iron Man #8


Anybody remember the classic Iron Man story “Demon in a Bottle”? Well, it had to happen… Tony Stark: Iron Man #8 introduces “Digital Demon in a Bottle!” Is he addicted to his cell phone? Can you see Tony Stark on Tinder?

Captain America #7
Captain America #7


Artist Adam Kubert joins writer Ta-Nehisi Coates in Captain America #7, where Cap is wanted for murder! Cover by Alex Ross.

Black Panther vs. Deadpool #4
Black Panther vs. Deadpool #4


Black Panther vs. Deadpool #4 (of 5) — A classic Marvel team-up gone terribly wrong! Only one issue left!

Doctor Strange #10
Doctor Strange #10


Doctor Strange #10 is actually Doctor Strange #400!!! (Please don’t make me do the math!) It’s a 48-page story with art by Jesus Saiz, Chris Bachalo, Kevin Nowlan, and even more artists doing writer Mark Waid’s bidding. I bid for Mark Waid once. Please don’t make me tell that story… Waid waves his hands a lot, and a magical story will appear! And then later Dr. Strange appears in Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #39, but that wasn’t Waid’s idea. (I think.) (This job is hard.)

Wolverine: The Long Night Adaptation #1
Wolverine: The Long Night Adaptation #1


Wolverine is finally back in Return of Wolverine #5 in January. That same month, Wolverine: The Long Night Adaptation #1 (of 5) debuts — based on the hit scripted podcast “Wolverine: The Dark Night” written by Benjamin Percy with art by Marciko Takara. Meanwhile, Dead Man Logan encounters Mysterio who means to set in motion the massacre at the crux of Logan’s apocalyptic future timeline. Say that five times really fast!

X-Force #2
X-Force #2


Mutant logic: X-Force has been framed for murder! To clear their names, they reluctantly team-up with the young Cable and Deathlok. Maybe X-Force #2 might explain more.

Uncanny X-Men 3D #1 (#268)
Uncanny X-Men 3D #1 (#268)


Marvel is reprinting the landmark Uncanny X-Men #268 in 3-D by Chris Claremont and Jim Lee. Which is now old enough that everybody has to wear glasses to read it. 3-D Glasses, that is! (included)

Kirby Is Fantastic! King-Size HC
Kirby Is Fantastic! King-Size HC


Marvel is now doing some super-Giant “King-Size” volumes featuring classic Jack Kirby artwork. Problem is, they’ve neglected to mention the actual dimensions of this oversize treat (nor show us the actual cover) which makes it really difficult to recommend it. Which I really want to (it includes all the early classic FF stories by Stan and Jack), but I just can’t without all the info. Perhaps Marvel should resolicit this next month — including the dimensions of the book! It’s the least Marvel should do for a 320-page $100 hardcover!

__________________________________

KC CARLSON wrote this column under the influence of a lot of cold medicine and very little sleep. He promises not to do it again. (At least this week…)

WESTFIELD COMICS is not responsible for the stupid things that KC says. Especially that thing that really irritated you. I’m actually too tired to be irritated this week. But wasn’t the season premiere of DC’s Legends of Tomorrow awesome! Made me wish I was actually at Woodstock!

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Beauology 101: Crimes Of Fashion

Beau Smith and Melanie Scrofano (Wynonna Earp) One Wrote This Column And The Other Is Just Really Well Dressed.
Beau Smith and Melanie Scrofano (Wynonna Earp) One Wrote This Column And The Other Is Just Really Well Dressed.


by Beau Smith

As a kid I knew that most of the costumes that superheroes wore in comic books would never work in real life. I didn’t care.

The reason I didn’t care was because I was 12 years old and these folks in four color print were mashing the mucus out of each other and busting up buildings like Godzilla on a tour of Japan. You can see my envy. As a kid, I dreamed of doing this kinda stuff every day.

The Invisible Girl-Pretty Practical.
The Invisible Girl-Pretty Practical.


For the most part, there’s not a lot of true stealth and practicality for superheroes and villains. The Invisible Girl/Woman is about the only hero with any true sneakiness about her, and she doesn’t really have to worry about what her costume looks like, although in the 1960s that was about all she seemed to fret about.

In my opinion, I think the costuming is a part of the reason that there weren’t many superhero movies made pre-1980. (Budget and technology were also HUGE reasons.) Back then, there wasn’t much of a way of pulling off gaudy garments and making the viewers believe this stuff could happen. I remember being in 6th grade and watching the famous 1966 BATMAN TV series with Adam West and Burt Ward. I was SO glad to finally have a superhero TV show and I was more than happy to overlook the campy feel, the jokes, and yes, even the look of the costumes.

You Wear It Well. A Little Old Fashioned, But That’s Alright. Batman and Robin, Burt Ward and Adam West 1966 Batman TV Series.
You Wear It Well. A Little Old Fashioned, But That’s Alright. Batman and Robin, Burt Ward and Adam West 1966 Batman TV Series.


I’ll never forget the first time actor, Burt Ward, showed up on screen in his Robin outfit, I thought to myself, “If he was on our school playground in that outfit, he wouldn’t be leaving with his lunch money, only a black eye and a wedgie.” (Remember, this was 1966. Bullying and body shaming didn’t have quite the cultural weight they have today.) Being on TV in the flesh was eyeball proof that Robin wears, and always has worn, an Elf outfit that would embarrass the tree dwelling elves of Keebler.

The Fantastic Four Unity In Uniforms.
The Fantastic Four Unity In Uniforms.


Once again, in my opinion, the most realistic and functional costumes were those of The Fantastic Four. Super-brain, Reed Richards-Mister Fantastic, figured not to waste time and effort with any secret identities, no hassles looking for phone booths to change clothes in and risk being arrested for public exposure. So Reed created costumes/uniforms out of unstable molecules so they could adapt and form any shape the owner found themselves in, such as Mister Fantastic stretching nearly a mile, Invisible Girl turning transparent and her wardrobe with her. The Human Torch could ignite into flames, and The Thing could get by wearing swimming trunks! Not a bad idea at all. I’d sing up with that company uniform.

So, let’s run down a few well-known superhero costumes and see how they rate:

Superman: No mask, skin tight outfit, not a bad idea when you look like he does. The skink tight uniform makes it hard for anyone to grab a hold of you and use it against you. Colors are a bit flashy, but then when you can do all the things Superman can do, who’s to knock your color scheme? My gripe is the cape. You’re just begging for trouble. Someone is gonna grab it, choke you with it, cover your head with it and rain down punches on you like it was a hockey fight in the NHL.

Batman: He roams around mostly at night, so the color scheme is great. Utility belt is very smart! Batman was a Prepper before there was prepping. He can and does carry loads of high-tech weapons as well as some walking around cash. He thinks of everything. The cowl is a bit of a bust. Hard to turn your head, you lack side vision. Needs some flexible changes there. Cape, that’s gotta go, like Superman, it’s a problem waiting to happen.

Captain America. Timeless Togs.
Captain America. Timeless Togs.


Captain America: If you’re gonna wear flashy colors then you can’t go wrong with the Red, White and Blue. It’s never out of style and the design of the costume is flat out brilliant. Protective gloves and boots, high-tech chainmail is all a huge plus against punches, bullets and rough outings in hostile territories. The gloves help sling and catch the shield, which is an amazing piece of gear. Again, the design of his outfit is pure genius.

The Incredible Hulk-Go Ahead, YOU Tell Him His Socks Don’t Match.
The Incredible Hulk-Go Ahead, YOU Tell Him His Socks Don’t Match.


The Incredible Hulk: Come on, when you’re THAT big and THAT strong, who’s gonna argue with purple pants?

Iron Man: In reality, you wouldn’t be able to move well enough in this super suit to really work well. You’d be more of a flying missile or rocket launching tank. The films have shown how it could work and also have made it easier to suspend disbelief.

Doctor Doom-No….Really….I Like Your Cape……
Doctor Doom-No….Really….I Like Your Cape……


Doctor Doom: As much as I love the iconic look, Doctor Doom’s costume is one of the worst in the real world, Clanky, Clunky, and extremely hard to see out of. It also has the much hated cape…with a hood as well. Then again, Doctor Doom is such a badass he could deal with it and make it work.

Wonder Woman WARdrobe
Wonder Woman WARdrobe


Wonder Woman: Although it would be great to see the best looking woman in all comics wearing this outfit, let’s face it, if she got in a tussle with Doomsday costume malfunctions would be a constant. This character deserves better.

Daredevil Team Yellow.
Daredevil Team Yellow.


Daredevil: Original costume was yellow, red and black. That right there tells you that a blind guy made that outfit. Second and current all red costume, still a blind man at the sewing machine. Design is great, but it should be all black.

Power Girl: Her costume IS her weapon…a Weapon Of Mass Distraction!

The bottom of the boot is that most non-super powered heroes like Batman and Daredevil would be dead or maimed a long time ago in a real world. With all the people taking shots at them in chaotic gunfights, snipers, and battles, it would only talk one spray of a 12 gauge shotgun to put these guys in the dirt for good, or lose the use of a limb. I think that’s why some writers are running into problems these days because they are trying way too hard to mix their favorite ultra violent films with the pure suspended belief world of superheroes. If they don’t watch it, sooner or later they will start to lose readers. Things will become so real, the reader is will be reminded that it could never BE real and lose their willingness to suspend disbelief. Today’s grumpy and gritty Batman will become tomorrow’s campy Batman. (Maybe that’s not a bad thing.) Remember, it’s the clothes that make the man, not the superhero.

Dressed for success,

Beau Smith

The Flying Fist Ranch

@BeauSmithRanch at Twitter and Instagram

 

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Markley’s Fevered Brain: Marvel’s Renaissance

Wayne Markley
Wayne Markley


by Wayne Markley

While as a general rule of thumb I hate when publishers relaunch their books with number ones over and over again, and both Marvel and DC are guilty of this, I am forced to admit with the most recent relaunch of the Marvel Universe, and by that I mean starting their biggest titles over with number ones not restarting the entire universe as DC has done a few times, I can forgive them as these books have been some of the best Marvel titles I have read in years. Over the last six months as Marvel was dropping bits and pieces of who was going to be doing what, I cannot say anything really got me excited, and on a few titles I was even concerned. Well, I was wrong. Almost all of these new books (and miniseries) have been amazing. They are well written, with strong plots that make me want to come back for more. These are stories that not only tell a current story but actually tease the future, and great art by a mix of new people to Marvel as well as some established artists. I have not enjoyed Marvel Comics this much since I was a kid. Here are a few reviews of just the most recent releases, so almost all of these have just one or two issues out so far, so time will tell if I continue to be so enthusiastic.

Captain America #1
Captain America #1


I was hesitant when it was annoyed that Ta-Nehisi Coates was going to take over writing Captain America because I did not care for his early work on Black Panther. I thought it was overly written and relied too heavily on Black Panther stories from the past to tell his story that was deep in the weeds in terms of politics and Wakanden history. With Captain America I was proven wrong, so wrong, I own Mr. Coates an apology. This book was fantastic. Following Mark Waid’s excellent (alas, too short) run on the book, I was fearful where the book would go next. Coates went back to the roots of the character and re-energized the star spangled Avenger in ways I did not expect. From the open page filled with Hydra agents, to an army of Nukes (the villain, not the weapon), add in the Winter Soldier and Agent 13 (dear old Sharon) and the actually end of Hydra, only to have a new one rise in its place while building on the stories from the last ten years. All the while Coates is able to define who Cap is and what makes him tick. From his aversion to killing, even though he has been a soldier his whole life, to his love and devotion to his country and the afore mentioned Sharon Carter. When you add in the beautiful art by Leinil Francis Yu, you come off with a near perfect book. I love Mark Waid’s run on the book but I must admit that Ta-Nehisi Coates may have topped him. A bit of a warning though, so far there has only been one issue so my opinion could change with time, but based on this first issue I would highly recommend this book.

Death of the Inhumans #1
Death of the Inhumans #1


Death of the Inhumans lives up to its name as by the end of number one a number of Inhumans are dead (keep in mind in comics being dead is not necessarily a permanent thing). For years now Marvel has tried over and over to push the Inhumans as an A level super-team book but none of the various incarnations has worked. I think part of this is because Marvel tried too hard to push them down the readers throats and instead of giving the readers good, compelling stories what we got was mediocre soap opera after soap opera. Instead of focusing on the original concept of the royal family of Inhumans, Marvel over the last few years has tried and tried to expand the franchise to recreate what the X-Men once were. Sadly, it has not worked. There have been some good stories here and there, and some interesting ideas started but alas, even the interesting stories seemed to have stalled and fallen apart. I do not know if this series will truly lead to the end of the Inhumans, and I hope it does not as I like the core group and I think they have a place in the Marvel Universe, but not on par with the Avengers or the X-Men or the Fantastic Four. To be fair though, writer Donny Cates and artist Ariel Olivetti do a very good job with this first issue (of five) and I was sad by the end with the death of a number of characters. If this is truly their farewell, then this is a nice sendoff.

Cosmic Ghost Rider #1
Cosmic Ghost Rider #1


Cosmic Ghost Rider is a five issue mini-series Donny Cates (again) and Dylan Burnett. This book spins out of the recently ended Thanos book also by Danny Cates. I will be honest in that I loved Cates run on Thanos, and have enjoyed almost everything he has written so far. Largely because he is will to take a chance and do things that are borderline absurd but work within the context of his stories. In this case, in the pages of Thanos, Thanos encountered a former herald of Galactus, who was a motor cycleriding cosmic version of the classic Ghost Rider; think Jonny Blaze in space. As it turns out, the Ghost Rider is in fact (warning: Spoiler Alert) Frank Castle, the Punisher. Just brilliant. A spirit of vengeance taking over a man devoting his life to punishing bad guys. The first issue of this miniseries goes back and explains how Frank Castle became the Ghost Rider. By the time the first issue wraps up, you have the Ghost Rider flying through space with a baby Thanos riding attached to his chest. Just great and creative stuff. This book was a really fun read that I really enjoyed. It was not quite as good as Thanos was, as this book lacked the element of surprise that Thanos had. The art works well for this type of story and it is filled with the typical Marvel cosmic trappings. Based on the first issue, I cannot wait to see where this mini-series is going. Based on the Coates track record so far I have a feeling it is going to be filled with surprises.

Amazing Spider-Man #1
Amazing Spider-Man #1


Amazing Spider-Man #1 is the new series following up on Dan Slott’s amazing ten year run on Amazing Spider-Man. While I did not enjoy everything Slott did over the last decade, I did enjoy the most of it. I also greatly enjoy Nick Spencer’s writing in general, particularly his Spider-Man work in the past, particularly his Superior Foes of Spider-Man, which I thought was great. So when they announced Nick Spencer was taking over Spider-Man I was a bit hesitant as Spencer’s Spider-Man in the past has tended to be more humorous and a very different style than Slott’s. Boy, was I wrong. This first issue by Spencer and artist Ryan Ottley (who seems like he was born for this gig) was tremendous. It was a perfect mix of humor and action and filled with little bits of subplot to set up stories for years to come. I have not enjoyed a book like this in years. Basically, Spencer strips Spider-Man of everything he has become over the years and puts him back to where he was under Stan Lee and Steve Ditko. Peter loses everything – honest, everything – lands up going back to school, is disgraced publically, loses his job, has a fights with the Rhino and Mysterio, Aunt May is displeased with him and it ends with the Lizard! (Plus there is another surprise at the end that takes us back to the early years, but it is the one good thing that happens to Peter.) This book surprised me as what a joy it was to read as it took me back to the days of Spider-Man’s earliest tales, but did not try to retro fit or do a back in time story or some other funky trick. Spencer was able to catch the essence of the original stories and bring them to a modern setting. As much as I enjoyed a lot of Slott’s run, and I did, this first issue made me forget about all of it and now I cannot wait to see where Spencer and Ottley are headed to in the future. If all of the issues are this good, I hope they stay around for a decade also!

Life of Captain Marvel #1
Life of Captain Marvel #1


As I am sure you can see from all of my blubbering, I have really enjoyed Marvel’s “renaissance”. They have taken almost all of their main characters and given them to creators I would not expect to fit with the character and come out with original and entertaining comics. What more can I ask for? There are other books recently I also really have enjoyed, such as The Immortal Hulk (which over the first three issues have all been standalone stories, bravo!) and the Life of Captain Marvel which has beautiful art and a very good story both explaining who Captain Marvel is as well as setting up her future. I suspect this miniseries is so they can have a trade out when the Captain Marvel movie is released that explains who she is, but it is working as this miniseries is excellent so far. I also have greatly enjoyed the new Avengers book, and I am mixed on the relaunch of Thor. I love the story and dialogue on Thor but I have a very hard time with the art which is pretty but does not work for the character, especially after the stunning work by Russell Dauterman. But that is a small complaint. Overall this is the most I have enjoyed a publisher’s line of books in years. At this point I look forward to each week’s new books as I know there will be a gem or two there. To be fair ,most of these books are new and only have one or two issues out so far so my opinions may change over time, but right now I am going to sit back and enjoy the new Marvel Universe.

As you might suspect, I would love to hear from you as to what you think of all of these books. Have you read them? Did you enjoy them as much as I have? What do you think? I truly would like to know. I can be reached at MFBWAY@AOL.COM or on Facebook at Wayne Markley. All of these thoughts, and even words, are mine and do not reflect the thoughts and opinions of Westfield Comics or their employees. And finally,

Thank you.

 

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MARVEL TODAY: THREE NEW INTRODUCTIONS AND (Almost) A CONCLUSION

KC Carlson


A KC COLUMN by KC Carlson

These four new Marvel comics are being released today at your local comic shop!

Avengers #1
Avengers #1


Avengers #1: Introducing the new creative team of writer Jason Aaron and artist Ed McGuinness! Plus, as you may suspect — The Old Order Changeth! I won’t spill too many beans, but there’s now an Avengers guy whose head is on fire! Plus somebody big, mean, and green! But most fans will thrilled that the Big Three of Thor Odinson, Steve Rogers, and Tony Stark are finally back together on the team (at least for now!). And issue #2 spotlights Black Panther and Dr. Strange!

Avengers #2
Avengers #2


What’s this about “Odin’s ancient band of Prehistoric Avengers” and a certain Prince of Lies? If that wasn’t enough, apparently Jason Aaron plans to rewrite “everything we know about the origin of the Marvel Universe!” Again?… That trick never works! Also, for Marvel’s “Fresh Start” campaign, there will be 18 issues of The Avengers each year (as opposed to just 12). This will be the only Avengers ongoing title — at least for the foreseeable future!

Captain America #701
Captain America #701


Captain America #701: Writer Mark Waid is sticking with this title. (I suspect the only way to get him off the book would be to pry it from his cold, dead hands. Eww.) Joined by artist Leonardo Romero (with others), his first new storyline is titled “Promised Land” and is set in the future, the year 2314. The grandson of Steve Rogers thrives in the utopian America that his ancestor dreamed of — but of course, something quite sinister is lurking about. And descendants of other notable Marvel Heroes may also be a part of this future! Plus, some of those “other” artists mentioned earlier may include Howard Chaykin, Alan Davis, and Chris Samnee! It seems that this title has quite a future — in more ways than one!

Hunt For Wolverine #1
Hunt For Wolverine #1


Hunt For Wolverine #1/Hunt For Wolverine: Weapon Lost #1 (of 4): Last week, Hunt For Wolverine #1 began the the story of Wolverine’s active return to the Marvel Universe. (What? You didn’t think Marvel would leave one of its most popular characters actually dead forever, did you? How long have you been reading superhero comic books?) The Reavers have discovered info about Wolverine’s death and decide to investigate. When the X-Men discover the Reavers have found Logan’s tomb in Canada, they quickly descend on the site to intervene. Flashbacks bring us up-to-date about Logan’s actual “death” and subsequent internment inside a mystic statue. But by the time the Reavers reach the statue, they find it ripped apart by something super strong — as well as empty. The Hunt for Wolverine miniseries serves up a lot of unanswered questions — most of which will be presumably resolved in four new miniseries.

Hunt For Wolverine: Weapon Lost #1
Hunt For Wolverine: Weapon Lost #1


Today sees the publication of Hunt For Wolverine: Weapon Lost #1, written by Charles Soule, art by Matteo Buffagni. Is Wolverine actually alive? With such a big mystery to solve, comics’ greatest detectives are out to solve the mystery! (And I’m NOT talking about those idiot kids and their goofy dog!) Daredevil assembles a team of really smart people, including the bionic Misty Knight, Nuhuman Frank McGee, and the mutant known as Cypher, who apparently knows a thing or two about coming back from being dead. In issue #1, this squad uncovers a deep conspiracy with huge ramifications for Wolverine’s future.

Hunt For Wolverine: The Claws of a Killer #1
Hunt For Wolverine: The Claws of a Killer #1


Also, this month sees the debut of three other Hunt for Wolverine miniseries, including The Adamantium Agenda, in which the New Avengers (Iron Man, Spider-Man, Jessica Jones, and Luke Cage) discover both conspiracy and metallurgic miracle! In The Claws of a Killer, Marvel villains search for Logan. “Keep your friends dead, but your enemies deader!” Features Sabertooth and Daken. Wolverine’s former alter-ego Patch is sighted in Mystery in Madripoor, and Kitty Pryde, Storm, Rogue, Psylocke, Domino, and Jubilee try to find him. (What is it with Logan and young women anyway?)

S.H.I.E.L.D. by Hickman and Weaver: The Rebirth #1
S.H.I.E.L.D. by Hickman and Weaver: The Rebirth #1


S.H.I.E.L.D. by Hickman and Weaver: The Rebirth #1: Back In 2010-2011-ish, writer Jonathan Hickman and artist Dustin Weaver revamped S.H.I.E.L.D. for the modern Marvel Universe. Less Nick Fury’s old super-spy 1960s S.H.I.E.L.D. (Fury supposedly “died” during Original Sin in 2014, but recently popped up in The Unworthy Thor #1 as a miserable creature who refers to himself as The Unseen, who also references the death of The Watcher — which also happened during Original Sin), the Hickman/Weaver version of S.H.I.E.L.D. was more about Michelangelo, Leonardo Da Vinci, Isaac Newton, Nikola Tesla, Galileo, Nostradamus, and… um… Howard Stark (Tony’s Dad!). I’m not going to pretend that I understood anything about this series — but it did intrigue me more than the former super-spy stuff — which now seems horribly dated (yet still much fun to read with a proper 1960-70s mindset).

S.H.I.E.L.D. by Hickman and Weaver #6
S.H.I.E.L.D. by Hickman and Weaver #6


Anyway… the second series of the Hickman/Weaver S.H.I.E.L.D. series just kinda disappeared into the either back in 2011 without much explanation. But Marvel has announced that S.H.I.E.L.D. (2011) #5 and #6 will finally be published later in May — just a few weeks away! But first — and out today — is S.H.I.E.L.D. by Hickman and Weaver: The Rebirth #1 which conveniently collects S.H.I.E.L.D. (2011) #1-4 so you can immediately get yourself caught up in this truly unique, unusual, and often unbelievable comic book series. (I think it’s pretty unbelievable that it’s actually back!)

_______________________________________

KC CARLSON will be at Westfield Comics East for Free Comic Book Day this Saturday (May 5) for much of the day. Please stop by and ask me questions! (Hopefully about comic books. What was with all those questions about plumbing last year?) My smarter half (Johanna Draper Carlson of comicsworthreading.com fame) will also be there (but only before 1pm). Also, my arch enemy Wayne Markley will probably be punching me all day to keep me awake! He’s evil!

WESTFIELD COMICS is not responsible for the stupid things that KC says. Especially that thing that really irritated you. I’m irritated that I’m wearing about three layers of clothing because my basement office is freezing, despite it being in the 80s outside! Achoo!

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Coming your way from Marvel Comics

Marvel has a number of new and exciting titles that are available for preorder now at WestfieldComics.com. Let’s take a look at some highlights.

Captain America #1
Captain America #1


Captain America #1

Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates (Black Panther) and artist Leinil Francis Yu (Avengers) set a new course for the Star-Spangled Avenger. Steve Rogers sets out to reestablish his standing as a hero in the wake of Secret Empire. Not everyone want to see him succeed. Who are the Power Elite and what will they do to keep Cap down?

 


Amazing Spider-Man #1
Amazing Spider-Man #1


Amazing Spider-Man #1 & 2

Spidey faces an alien invasion as Nick Spencer (Secret EmpireSuperior Foes Of Spider-Man) and Ryan Ottley (Invincible) step in as the new creative team. There’s also a new roommate, new love interests, and a new villain. This is a great book for new and long time readers.

 


Infinity Wars Prime #1
Infinity Wars Prime #1


Infinity Wars Prime #1

The Countdown is over and the War begins. The shocking events from this issue will impact the entire Marvel Universe.

 


Astonishing X-Men #13
Astonishing X-Men #13


Astonishing X-Men #13

A new team of X-Men and a new creative team! Havok, Beast, Dazzler, Warpath, and Colossus join forces to take on the Reavers, who have a startling new weapon. Matthew Rosenberg (Punisher) and Greg Land (Incredible Hulk) bring the excitement.

 


True Believers: Fantastic Four #1
True Believers: Fantastic Four #1


Celebrate the return of the Fantastic Four with specially price True Believers issues that reprint pivotal moments in FF history.


Star Wars #50
Star Wars #50


Star Wars reaches its landmark 50th issue and Hope Dies begins by Kieron Gillen and Salvador Larroca. This special story bridges the gap between the films A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back.


Death of the Inhumans #1
Death of the Inhumans #1


On top of this, there are exciting new miniseries including the ominously named Death of the Inhumans by Donny Cates and Ariel Olivetti; the further adventures of Cosmic Ghost Rider from Donny Cates and Dylan Burnett; Margaret Stohl and Carlos Pacheco bring you the definitive origin of Carol Danvers in The Life of Captain Marvel; and Ed Piskor’s popular history of Marvel’s Merry Mutants continues in X-Men: Grand Design – Second Genesis.

This only scratches the surface of all the great Marvel Comics available at WestfieldComics.com. Don’t miss your opportunity to order any of these great comics!

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Adam Hughes, JG Jones and more join Mark Waid on CAPTAIN AMERICA 701 & 702

Captain America #702
Captain America #702


Plus, your first look at the cover for Captain America #702!

Captain America #701 Leonardo Romero art preview page 1
Captain America #701 Leonardo Romero art preview page 1


Captain America #701 Leonardo Romero art preview page 2
Captain America #701 Leonardo Romero art preview page 2


Captain America #701 Leonardo Romero art preview page 3
Captain America #701 Leonardo Romero art preview page 3


New York, NY—April 2nd, 2018—The year is 2134, and the legacy of Captain America lives on…not only shaping the future of the country, but the future of Steve Rogers’ family! This May, series writer Mark Waid will be joined by Leonardo Romero (Hawkeye) and a host of superstar guest artists such as Adam Hughes, JG Jones, Chris Sprouse and Howard Chaykin, as Captain America’s storied history in the Marvel Universe is spotlighted in an all-new adventure told through the eyes of Steve Rogers’ grandson!

Captain America #701 Adam Hughes preview art
Captain America #701 Adam Hughes preview art


But this seemingly perfect utopia isn’t exactly the America Steve Rogers dreamed of…

“For the PROMISED LAND storyline, because it takes advantage of the entire history and legend of Captain America, we deliberately constructed the issues to allow us to take advantage of contributions from special guest artists,” said SVP and Executive Editor Tom Brevoort. “So along with Leonardo Romero, who’s doing the backbone of the story, we’ll have sequences in #701 by Adam Hughes and JG Jones, and in #702 by Chris Sprouse and Howard Chaykin. #703 and #704 will have their own guest contributors as well—but we’ll keep those under wraps for the time being!”

Captain America #701 JG Jones art preview page 1
Captain America #701 JG Jones art preview page 1


Captain America #701 JG Jones art preview page 2
Captain America #701 JG Jones art preview page 2


Don’t miss the next incredible arc of Steve Rogers’ story starting in CAPTAIN AMERICA #701, on sale this May!

 

CAPTAIN AMERICA #701

Written by MARK WAID

Art by LEONARDO ROMERO with JG JONES & ADAM HUGHES

Cover by MICHAEL CHO

 

 

Captain America #702 Howard Chaykin preview page
Captain America #702 Howard Chaykin preview page


CAPTAIN AMERICA #702

Art by LEONARDO ROMERO with HOWARD CHAYKIN & CHRIS SPROUSE

Cover by MICHAEL CHO

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Marvel Announces CAPTAIN AMERICA #1 by Ta-Nehisi Coates & Leinil Yu

Captain America #1
Captain America #1


Featuring an all-new creative team and all-new direction!

New York, NY—February 28, 2018—New creative teams. New series. New directions. New beginnings. It all kicks off this July with CAPTAIN AMERICA #1!

“I think it’s a really exciting time to be writing Captain America right now,” said Coates. “The country is in an interesting place, and I look forward to inhabiting Steve Rogers’ character – this guy who has been a sort of awkward fit for the world, out of time as people say. I hope fans are excited to see something different, and I think there are some really compelling villains old school Captain America fans and Marvel fans will be familiar with.”

“Finding the right voice to tell the tales of Marvel’s beloved characters is never an easy task, but when it came time to hire the new hand to guide Captain America, we just knew it had to be Ta-Nehisi Coates!” shared Editor-In-Chief C.B. Cebulski. “After re-inventing the Black Panther for the modern era, Ta-Nehisi now brings his sharp scripting sensibilities to Steve Rogers and his new place in the Marvel Universe. With Leinil Yu and Sunny Gho bringing all the incredible action to life in big, bold visuals, you will not be able to put this book down. And our launch is timed perfectly for release on the Fourth of July!”

Avengers/Captain America Free Comic Book Day
Avengers/Captain America Free Comic Book Day


Fans will be able to read the first Captain America story from Ta-Nehisi Coates and Leinil Yu in the Avengers/Captain America Free Comic Book Day issue, on sale May 5th – and can view the back cover art of the issue by Leinil Yu for the first time now!

For more information on CAPTAIN AMERICA, including an exclusive commentary from Ta-Nehisi Coates, visit The Atlantic.

 

CAPTAIN AMERICA #1

Written by TA-NEHISI COATES

Art by LEINIL YU

Cover by ALEX ROSS

 

FREE COMIC BOOK DAY CAPTAIN AMERICA #1

Written by TA-NEHISI COATES

Art by LEINIL YU

Cover by LEINIL YU

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CAPTAIN AMERICA Reaches a Milestone With 700th Issue!

Captain America #700 Chris Samnee cover
Captain America #700 Chris Samnee cover


The “Out of Time” arc culminates in an epic, oversized tale!

New York, NY—January 8, 2018—This spring, OUT OF TIME will culminate with the release of CAPTAIN AMERICA’s milestone 700th issue, concluding the arc in an oversized story from creators Mark Waid and Chris Samnee!

Frozen in time, awakened in a decimated future and once again a man out of his era, there is only one way for Steve Rogers to restore order and rebuild civilization—and that’s to rule it as King Captain America!

Captain America #700 Jim Lee Variant cover
Captain America #700 Jim Lee Variant cover


“No dream, no hoax, no lie, this IS Cap and this IS happening!” said SVP and Executive Editor Tom Brevoort. “Guest-starring the Thing and the Hulk (or as much as is left of them), it’s a celebration of 700 issues of star-spangled adventure! Plus, Mark Waid delivers an untold tale from Captain America’s past, featuring the classic artwork of Jack Kirby!”

Don’t miss the conclusion of an arc that has seen some of Steve Rogers’ most epic adventures in CAPTAIN AMERICA #700, on sale this spring!

 

Captain America #700 Jim Steranko Variant cover
Captain America #700 Jim Steranko Variant cover


CAPTAIN AMERICA #700

Written by MARK WAID

Art and Cover by CHRIS SAMNEE

Variant Covers by JIM LEE and JIM STERANKO

On-Sale 4/4/18