Markley’s Fevered Brain: 52 Thoughts on 2011


Batman Vol. 1: The Court of Owls

Batman Vol. 1: The Court of Owls



Westfield’s Wayne Markley looks back at 52 things that shaped comics in 2011.

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Roger’s Comic Ramblings: Whatever Happened To Comic Strip Collections?


Mutts

Mutts



Westfield’s Roger Ash ponders about the decline in collections of modern comic strips.

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10 THINGS I LIKE ABOUT APRIL 2011 COMICS


Archie's Mad House Vol. 1

Archie's Mad House Vol. 1



KC Carlson looks cool books in the new issue of Previews including IDW’s Archie’s Mad House, Dark Horse’s Dark Horse Presents, Fantagraphics’ Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse, and more.

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KC Column: The Never-Ending Story Part 1


KC flanked by former Legionnaire artists, Cory Carani & Jeff Moy

by KC Carlson

Though we may be inundated by it in current superhero comic books, long-form serialized storytelling is nothing new.

The idea of telling a long-form storyline as a series of chapters originally dates back to somewhere between the mid-8th and the mid-13th century. The work in question? One Thousand and One Nights, more colloquially known in English as the Arabian Nights. They are actually a series of independent stories gathered together with a framing device, but as originally told, each story was shared over a period of nights, including some kind of “cliffhanger” ending, which would be resolved the following night. Some of the more famous of the stories include “Aladdin’s Wonderful Lamp”, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, and “The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor”, all of which are probably much better known to several generations of American children as the basis for three very memorable (and historically important) Popeye the Sailor cartoons.

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For Your Consideration: IDW’s Bloom County Complete Library


Bloom County Complete Library Volume 1

by Robert Greenberger

There really hadn’t been a major comic strip to capture America’s imagination in a broad spectrum way since Doonesbury debuted nearly a decade earlier, so when Bloom County arrived in December 1980, the public was pretty ready for something new and different. Evolving from The Academia Waltz , a University of Texas newspaper strip, just like Doonesbury and Liberty Meadows, Berke Breathed expanded his cast of human and animal characters, finding his “adult” voice and used his players to comment on not only the human condition but current events, making it topical.

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Too Much Cool Stuff – Not Enough $$$! – August ‘09


SugarShock cover

by KC Carlson

Long-time Westfield readers might remember that I used to do a regular recommendations column back in the days when our computers still ran on coal. For those many thousands of generations of comics fans who were born since then, I’d like to explain, for a second or two, how my recommendations work, since there’s no real overt logic at work here.

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