For Your Consideration: Marvel’s She-Hulk by Dan Slott: Complete Collection Vol. 2

She-Hulk by Dan Slott: Complete Collection Vol. 2

She-Hulk by Dan Slott: Complete Collection Vol. 2


by Robert Greenberger

Originally conceived in the Mighty Marvel Manner, She-Hulk was merely a distaff version of the incredible guy connected in several ways by blood. She really didn’t develop her unique place in the universe until John Byrne arrived to give her a memorable solo series. He played it for laughs, tearing down the fourth wall and letting her engage with the readers. At a time when grim and gritty overwhelmed the racks, this was a welcome breath of fresh irreverence.

She was reduced to supporting player status for much of the 1990s and finally regained a book to rampage through in 2005. Under the guiding hand of Dan Slott, though, he found the right mix of humor, satire, adventure, and characterization bringing just-deserved acclaim. Now, as Dan takes his bows for a job well done with Superior Spider-Man, Marvel is releasing his earlier work with She-Hulk by Dan Slott: Complete Collection Vol. 2 coming this spring. The collection includes She-Hulk #6-21 and material from Marvel Westerns: Two-Gun Kid #1 (which is largely a flashback involving an adventure against a supernatural foe with art by Eduardo Barreto).

She-Hulk #6 cover by Greg Horn

She-Hulk #6 cover by Greg Horn


She-Hulk was larger than life in many ways and was a truly liberated woman, holding down two careers and indulged in drinking, partying, and sleeping with men at whim without mooning over them. Jennifer Walters embraced her life until she crossed a line and was asked to leave Avengers Mansion. She was forced to take a job, working in the law library at Goodman, Lieber, Kurtzberg & Holliway, which insisted she work in her human form. In this volume, she returns to the courtroom to press her sexual-assault case – against fellow Avenger Starfox who she claims used his innate abilities to impel her to have sex with him. Not since Matt Murdock actually tried cases was there this much fun in a courtroom. Considering the slyly named firm specialized in superhero law, each issue was packed with heroes and villains making walk-throughs. And the antics were not just limited to Earth as the Living Tribunal, Thanos, and Stafox’s Titan relatives all pay a visit.

The series also benefited from a diverse and rich supporting cast including Awesome Andy, once the Mad Thinker’s Awesome Android but now the Benny of the law offices, communicating through his ever-present chalkboard; the time-displaced Two-Gun Kid as their retained bounty-hunter/bailiff; and Stu, her fellow librarian who appears to be Slott’s mouthpiece throughout the series.

She-Hulk #20 cover by Emily Watson

She-Hulk #20 cover by Emily Watson


Osvaldo Oyola at the Hooded Utilitarian wrote, “At the heart of Dan Slott’s run on what are referred to as She-Hulk volumes 1 & 2… is an alternately critical and nostalgic concern with the subjects of continuity and rupture in serialized superhero comic book narratives. Slott uses the space of a marginal title that probably never sold very well to undertake a meta-narrative project that is as much enmeshed in the insularity of the mainstream comics world (what many people refer to as “continuity porn”) as it is a critique of such obsessions.”

Slott doesn’t shy away from the big questions, the moral decisions Jennifer has to make in both her incarnations. She has to choose a side during the Civil War and determine if it is appropriate for S.H.I.E.L.D. to expect her to tackle her cousin’s enemies after the Illuminati sent Bruce Banner into space. He delves into personal issues, too, especially when she marries John Jameson and then has to deal with problems his Man-Wolf alter ego encounters. When she learns her whirlwind romance was courtesy of Starfox, she has to deal with her new domesticity (complicated by Jameson being genuinely in love with her).

She-Hulk #11 cover by Greg Horn

She-Hulk #11 cover by Greg Horn


Oyola added, “The comic has a lot of respect and attention to the minute convolutions of Marvel Comic history—one might even go so far to say it has a reverence for them—while never forgetting they are just funny books. The fun is in engaging with the stories to find ways as fans to make sense of it all (or just make fun of the fact that it doesn’t make sense), but not to take it all so seriously that you come off as if trying to argue a federal case from comic books.”

Under covers from Greg Horn, the series was ably illustrated at first by Will Conrad, then after two Paul Smith fill-ins, Rich Burchett came on to perfectly blend with Slott. The final three issues in this collection were co-written by Ty Templeton, no slouch at meta-humor either.

She-Hulk #13 cover by Greg Horn

She-Hulk #13 cover by Greg Horn


There are too few comics at Marvel these days that so gleefully play with the comic book conventions and Marvel continuity and this collection reminds us how much fun that could be.

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She-Hulk by Dan Slott: Complete Collection Vol. 2

Classic comic covers from the Grand Comics Database.

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